Hebrews

  • Hebrews Facts

    13 chapters
    303 verses
    6,898 words
    Author Letters Genre

  • Hebrews Word Cloud

    This word cloud picture shows the most repeated words in Hebrews

  • Writings about Hebrews

    Christian education materials about Hebrews, including book overviews, reading guides for the Author Letters genre, discussion questions, discipleship lessons, and throught-provoking essay.

  • Hebrews Daily Readings

    Start reading or listening to Hebrews and its associated daily readers on Day 363 when Hebrews begins

Daily Reader for Day 366: Hebrews 12 - 13


by Dave Moore

As we come down the home stretch of this letter the question of author and recipient should quickly be addressed.  The title “To the Hebrews” appears in the earliest times but is found nowhere in the letter.  It is possible this is original; it is also possible that it was appended as an appropriate representation of its original audience.  The term “Hebrew” is rarely heard in the Bible, and when it is used it is most often being spoken by, or around, foreigners.  It is found twice in Paul’s writings, but interestingly it is found alongside, rather than instead of, “Israelite,” as though the terms were not entirely synonymous. 

We do receive hints that there is a specific group of believers in mind, as when in chapter 5 the author accuses his readers of having “become dull of hearing.”  There is also the historical referent in chapter 13 that “our brother Timothy has been released.”  The author expresses familiarity with his audience, but outside of the closing paragraph, and occasional uses of “we,” he only refers to himself once.  That the church counted this as part of the Scriptures points to an apostolic author, but none is affirmed with certainty.  Paul is possible based on feel and content, but the text does not insist upon it. 

Chapter 12 acknowledges “the great cloud of witnesses” that precedes it, and it opens a sequence of exhortations that will conclude the letter.  There is too much here to highlight, and calling attention to a few expressions might seem to be elevating them above the rest.  These are not presented in an optional tone, but rather as commands to those who should “lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and… run with endurance the race that is set before us.”

Throughout these various commands, encouragements, and challenges, I hope you’ll pick up on how the author grounds his readers: with statements about the very nature of Jesus Christ: “Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith… the mediator of a new covenant… ‘I will never leave you nor forsake you’… the same yesterday, today, and forever… the great Shepherd of the sheep.” 

Our verse for this week is Psalm 71:3: Be to me a rock of refuge, to which I continually come; You have given the command to save me, for You are my rock and my fortress. 

Hebrews 12 and 13.  Now let’s read it!

Hebrews 12 - 13

12:1 Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.

Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted. In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. And have you forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as sons?

  “My son, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord,
    nor be weary when reproved by him.
  For the Lord disciplines the one he loves,
    and chastises every son whom he receives.”

It is for discipline that you have to endure. God is treating you as sons. For what son is there whom his father does not discipline? If you are left without discipline, in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons. Besides this, we have had earthly fathers who disciplined us and we respected them. Shall we not much more be subject to the Father of spirits and live? For they disciplined us for a short time as it seemed best to them, but he disciplines us for our good, that we may share his holiness. For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.

Therefore lift your drooping hands and strengthen your weak knees, and make straight paths for your feet, so that what is lame may not be put out of joint but rather be healed. Strive for peace with everyone, and for the holiness without which no one will see the Lord. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no “root of bitterness” springs up and causes trouble, and by it many become defiled; that no one is sexually immoral or unholy like Esau, who sold his birthright for a single meal. For you know that afterward, when he desired to inherit the blessing, he was rejected, for he found no chance to repent, though he sought it with tears.

For you have not come to what may be touched, a blazing fire and darkness and gloom and a tempest and the sound of a trumpet and a voice whose words made the hearers beg that no further messages be spoken to them. For they could not endure the order that was given, “If even a beast touches the mountain, it shall be stoned.” Indeed, so terrifying was the sight that Moses said, “I tremble with fear.” But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable angels in festal gathering, and to the assembly of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven, and to God, the judge of all, and to the spirits of the righteous made perfect, and to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood that speaks a better word than the blood of Abel.

See that you do not refuse him who is speaking. For if they did not escape when they refused him who warned them on earth, much less will we escape if we reject him who warns from heaven. At that time his voice shook the earth, but now he has promised, “Yet once more I will shake not only the earth but also the heavens.” This phrase, “Yet once more,” indicates the removal of things that are shaken—that is, things that have been made—in order that the things that cannot be shaken may remain. Therefore let us be grateful for receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, and thus let us offer to God acceptable worship, with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire.

13:1 Let brotherly love continue. Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares. Remember those who are in prison, as though in prison with them, and those who are mistreated, since you also are in the body. Let marriage be held in honor among all, and let the marriage bed be undefiled, for God will judge the sexually immoral and adulterous. Keep your life free from love of money, and be content with what you have, for he has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” So we can confidently say,

  “The Lord is my helper;
    I will not fear;
  what can man do to me?”

Remember your leaders, those who spoke to you the word of God. Consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever. Do not be led away by diverse and strange teachings, for it is good for the heart to be strengthened by grace, not by foods, which have not benefited those devoted to them. We have an altar from which those who serve the tent have no right to eat. For the bodies of those animals whose blood is brought into the holy places by the high priest as a sacrifice for sin are burned outside the camp. So Jesus also suffered outside the gate in order to sanctify the people through his own blood. Therefore let us go to him outside the camp and bear the reproach he endured. For here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city that is to come. Through him then let us continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that acknowledge his name. Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.

Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you.

Pray for us, for we are sure that we have a clear conscience, desiring to act honorably in all things. I urge you the more earnestly to do this in order that I may be restored to you the sooner.

Now may the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, equip you with everything good that you may do his will, working in us that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.

I appeal to you, brothers, bear with my word of exhortation, for I have written to you briefly. You should know that our brother Timothy has been released, with whom I shall see you if he comes soon. Greet all your leaders and all the saints. Those who come from Italy send you greetings. Grace be with all of you.

(ESV)

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