1 Timothy

  • 1 Timothy Facts

    6 chapters
    113 verses
    2,312 words
    Person Letters Genre

  • 1 Timothy Word Cloud

    This word cloud picture shows the most repeated words in 1 Timothy

  • Writings about 1 Timothy

    Christian education materials about 1 Timothy, including book overviews, reading guides for the Person Letters genre, discussion questions, discipleship lessons, and throught-provoking essay.

  • 1 Timothy Daily Readings

    Start reading or listening to 1 Timothy and its associated daily readers on Day 359 when 1 Timothy begins

Daily Reader for Day 360: 1 Timothy 5 - 6


by Dave Moore

“Let no one despise you for your youth, but set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity.  Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to exhortation, and to teaching.  Do not neglect the gift you have, which was given to you by prophecy when the council of elders laid their hands on you.  Practice these things, immerse yourself in them, so that all may see your progress.”  - 1 Timothy 4:12-15

The final two chapters of 1 Timothy feel much more personal and directed toward Timothy.  Beginning with the above passage in chapter 4, Paul focuses heavily, though not exclusively, on the “Man of God” that Paul wants his protégé to be. 

In chapter 5 there is an interlude, however, addressing how charity distributions to widows are to be handled.  Remember that one of the first controversies in the church, which we read about in Acts 6, had to do with fair treatment of widows.  The Jerusalem congregation’s resolution was primarily structural: certain leading men were designated as deacons to manage contributions and distributions.   Thus there is precedent for churches wrestling with questions about this, and it is natural that protocols would be incorporated into these instructions about establishment of leadership roles.

But the spotlight returns again to the character of the church’s leader.  It is hard to imagine, though, that these instructions are exclusive to Timothy alone.  Indeed, one of the peculiarities of these epistles to Timothy and Titus is that public reading is implied: only if the text was known to all could apostolic authority be enforced. 

So, put yourself in the room when these letters are read to everyone, wrestling with your responsibility to follow as Timothy is instructed about how to consider older and younger men, older and younger women… how to confront those who persist in sin… how to instruct those who are slaves… to “pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, steadfastness, gentleness.”  And to “fight the good fight of the faith.”

Our verse for this week is Deuteronomy 10:12: And now, Israel, what does the LORD your God require of you, but to fear the LORD your God, to walk in all His ways, to love Him, to serve the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul.

1 Timothy 5 and 6.  Now let’s read it!

1 Timothy 5 - 6

5:1 Do not rebuke an older man but encourage him as you would a father, younger men as brothers, older women as mothers, younger women as sisters, in all purity.

Honor widows who are truly widows. But if a widow has children or grandchildren, let them first learn to show godliness to their own household and to make some return to their parents, for this is pleasing in the sight of God. She who is truly a widow, left all alone, has set her hope on God and continues in supplications and prayers night and day, but she who is self-indulgent is dead even while she lives. Command these things as well, so that they may be without reproach. But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.

Let a widow be enrolled if she is not less than sixty years of age, having been the wife of one husband, and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work. But refuse to enroll younger widows, for when their passions draw them away from Christ, they desire to marry and so incur condemnation for having abandoned their former faith. Besides that, they learn to be idlers, going about from house to house, and not only idlers, but also gossips and busybodies, saying what they should not. So I would have younger widows marry, bear children, manage their households, and give the adversary no occasion for slander. For some have already strayed after Satan. If any believing woman has relatives who are widows, let her care for them. Let the church not be burdened, so that it may care for those who are truly widows.

Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching. For the Scripture says, “You shall not muzzle an ox when it treads out the grain,” and, “The laborer deserves his wages.” Do not admit a charge against an elder except on the evidence of two or three witnesses. As for those who persist in sin, rebuke them in the presence of all, so that the rest may stand in fear. In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus and of the elect angels I charge you to keep these rules without prejudging, doing nothing from partiality. Do not be hasty in the laying on of hands, nor take part in the sins of others; keep yourself pure. (No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent ailments.) The sins of some people are conspicuous, going before them to judgment, but the sins of others appear later. So also good works are conspicuous, and even those that are not cannot remain hidden.

6:1 Let all who are under a yoke as bondservants regard their own masters as worthy of all honor, so that the name of God and the teaching may not be reviled. Those who have believing masters must not be disrespectful on the ground that they are brothers; rather they must serve all the better since those who benefit by their good service are believers and beloved.

Teach and urge these things. If anyone teaches a different doctrine and does not agree with the sound words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the teaching that accords with godliness, he is puffed up with conceit and understands nothing. He has an unhealthy craving for controversy and for quarrels about words, which produce envy, dissension, slander, evil suspicions, and constant friction among people who are depraved in mind and deprived of the truth, imagining that godliness is a means of gain. But godliness with contentment is great gain, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content. But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs.

But as for you, O man of God, flee these things. Pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, steadfastness, gentleness. Fight the good fight of the faith. Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called and about which you made the good confession in the presence of many witnesses. I charge you in the presence of God, who gives life to all things, and of Christ Jesus, who in his testimony before Pontius Pilate made the good confession, to keep the commandment unstained and free from reproach until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ, which he will display at the proper time—he who is the blessed and only Sovereign, the King of kings and Lord of lords, who alone has immortality, who dwells in unapproachable light, whom no one has ever seen or can see. To him be honor and eternal dominion. Amen.

As for the rich in this present age, charge them not to be haughty, nor to set their hopes on the uncertainty of riches, but on God, who richly provides us with everything to enjoy. They are to do good, to be rich in good works, to be generous and ready to share, thus storing up treasure for themselves as a good foundation for the future, so that they may take hold of that which is truly life.

O Timothy, guard the deposit entrusted to you. Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” for by professing it some have swerved from the faith.

Grace be with you.

(ESV)

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