Romans

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    16 chapters
    433 verses
    9,460 words
    Church Letters Genre

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    This word cloud picture shows the most repeated words in Romans

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    Christian education materials about Romans, including book overviews, reading guides for the Church Letters genre, discussion questions, discipleship lessons, and thought-provoking essays.

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    Start reading or listening to Romans and its associated daily readers on Day 335 when Romans begins

Daily Reader for Day 337: Romans 6 - 7


by Dave Moore

Now the law came in to increase the trespass, but where sin increased, grace abounded all the more, so that, as sin reigned in death, grace also might reign through righteousness leading to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.  What shall we say then?  Are we to continue to sin that grace may abound? – Romans 5:20-6:1

Today’s rhetorical flourish is a series of “What shall we say then?” questions.  The first is above: “Are we to continue to sin that grace may abound?”  This is followed later with “Are we to sin because we are not under law but under grace?” and “What then shall we say? That the law is sin?”  Each of these expects an emphatically negative response: “By no means!” which Paul explains. 

The flourish of asking a question whose answer is intuitively obvious is one of the oldest Biblical traditions.  The LORD’s confrontation of the man and woman in the Garden of Eden was just a series of four questions: “Where are you? Who told you that you were naked?  Have you eaten of the tree…?” and “What is this that you have done?”  Both characters and readers already know the answers; the questions move the plot, more than the conversation.

So it is with Romans 6 and 7.  It’s possible that Paul is responding to questions or concerns that have been directly raised by the Roman church.  The early believers who converted out of Judaism certainly wrestled with the question of what to do with the Law.  We’ve already seen how this impacted evangelization efforts with Gentiles in Acts, and it was that very question that drove some to reject Jesus, who claimed He came not to abolish the Law or the prophets, but to fulfill them (Matthew 5:17).

It’s also possible that Paul is building toward the crescendo at the end of chapter 7.  I’ll not stand in the way of his responses, but encourage you to listen to how the argument builds toward a personal conclusion.

Our verse for this week is Genesis 1:1: In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.

Romans 6 and 7.  Now let’s read it!

Romans 6 - 7

6:1 What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? By no means! How can we who died to sin still live in it? Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life.

For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we shall certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his. We know that our old self was crucified with him in order that the body of sin might be brought to nothing, so that we would no longer be enslaved to sin. For one who has died has been set free from sin. Now if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. For the death he died he died to sin, once for all, but the life he lives he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.

Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, to make you obey its passions. Do not present your members to sin as instruments for unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and your members to God as instruments for righteousness. For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace.

What then? Are we to sin because we are not under law but under grace? By no means! Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness? But thanks be to God, that you who were once slaves of sin have become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching to which you were committed, and, having been set free from sin, have become slaves of righteousness. I am speaking in human terms, because of your natural limitations. For just as you once presented your members as slaves to impurity and to lawlessness leading to more lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves to righteousness leading to sanctification.

For when you were slaves of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness. But what fruit were you getting at that time from the things of which you are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. But now that you have been set free from sin and have become slaves of God, the fruit you get leads to sanctification and its end, eternal life. For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

7:1 Or do you not know, brothers—for I am speaking to those who know the law—that the law is binding on a person only as long as he lives? For a married woman is bound by law to her husband while he lives, but if her husband dies she is released from the law of marriage. Accordingly, she will be called an adulteress if she lives with another man while her husband is alive. But if her husband dies, she is free from that law, and if she marries another man she is not an adulteress.

Likewise, my brothers, you also have died to the law through the body of Christ, so that you may belong to another, to him who has been raised from the dead, in order that we may bear fruit for God. For while we were living in the flesh, our sinful passions, aroused by the law, were at work in our members to bear fruit for death. But now we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive, so that we serve in the new way of the Spirit and not in the old way of the written code.

What then shall we say? That the law is sin? By no means! Yet if it had not been for the law, I would not have known sin. For I would not have known what it is to covet if the law had not said, “You shall not covet.” But sin, seizing an opportunity through the commandment, produced in me all kinds of covetousness. For apart from the law, sin lies dead. I was once alive apart from the law, but when the commandment came, sin came alive and I died. The very commandment that promised life proved to be death to me. For sin, seizing an opportunity through the commandment, deceived me and through it killed me. So the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and righteous and good.

Did that which is good, then, bring death to me? By no means! It was sin, producing death in me through what is good, in order that sin might be shown to be sin, and through the commandment might become sinful beyond measure. For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am of the flesh, sold under sin. For I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. Now if I do what I do not want, I agree with the law, that it is good. So now it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells within me. For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh. For I have the desire to do what is right, but not the ability to carry it out. For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells within me.

So I find it to be a law that when I want to do right, evil lies close at hand. For I delight in the law of God, in my inner being, but I see in my members another law waging war against the law of my mind and making me captive to the law of sin that dwells in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, I myself serve the law of God with my mind, but with my flesh I serve the law of sin.

(ESV)

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