Leviticus

  • Leviticus Facts

    27 chapters
    859 verses
    23,440 words
    Pentateuch Genre

  • Leviticus Word Cloud

    This word cloud picture shows the most repeated words in Leviticus

  • Writings about Leviticus

    Christian education materials about Leviticus, including book overviews, reading guides for the Pentateuch genre, discussion questions, discipleship lessons, and thought-provoking essays.

  • Leviticus Daily Readings

    Start reading or listening to Leviticus and its associated daily readers on Day 32 when Leviticus begins

Daily Reader for Day 32: Leviticus 1 - 2


by Dave Moore

If you hear the word “Levi” in the title of this book, then you know what the book will be about. Aaron, the High Priest, and his sons, all of the tribe of Levi, were ordained by God to serve as His priests on behalf of the children of Israel. This book is about their work, and their work is to help the people of God maintain their relationship with God.

As we read the extensive legal code here, remember that this is part of an overall narrative that begins with a promise to Abraham and leads to the fulfillment of that promise. The law doesn’t stand on its own, only within a covenant that God has made with Israel. Ground all of this in light of the very beginning of His word to them: “I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.” Likewise, remember the promised end: “Before all your people I will do marvels…all the people among whom you are shall see the work of the LORD, for it is an awesome thing that I will do with you.

Remember also that salvation is not achieved by keeping this law. The Law is God’s instruction to Israel on how to maintain their part of the covenant, or how they can be faithful to Him as He remains faithful to them. Israel is constantly reminded that tit is “Holy,” or set apart, and adherence to the law is about maintaining a set-apart life.

There is little introduction here, except that Moses is called before the LORD to receive instructions. The very first commands have to do with burnt offerings. These offerings are to be the very best of the very best, whether bulls from the herd or sheep or goats from the flock.

Listen to how there is no distance between the person giving the offering and the animal that is given in his place. The same is true of the grain offerings; they require time and effort to offer. Sacrifices aren’t dropped off at the door for others to manage.

As we enter the reading I encourage you to just listen. The details reveal something about God and His expectations of His people.

Our verse for this week is Hebrews 11:29: By faith the people crossed the Red Sea as on dry land, but the Egyptians, when they attempted to do the same, were drowned.

Leviticus chapters 1 and 2. Now let’s read it!

Leviticus 1 - 2

1:1 The LORD called Moses and spoke to him from the tent of meeting, saying, “Speak to the people of Israel and say to them, When any one of you brings an offering to the LORD, you shall bring your offering of livestock from the herd or from the flock.

“If his offering is a burnt offering from the herd, he shall offer a male without blemish. He shall bring it to the entrance of the tent of meeting, that he may be accepted before the LORD. He shall lay his hand on the head of the burnt offering, and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him. Then he shall kill the bull before the LORD, and Aaron's sons the priests shall bring the blood and throw the blood against the sides of the altar that is at the entrance of the tent of meeting. Then he shall flay the burnt offering and cut it into pieces, and the sons of Aaron the priest shall put fire on the altar and arrange wood on the fire. And Aaron's sons the priests shall arrange the pieces, the head, and the fat, on the wood that is on the fire on the altar; but its entrails and its legs he shall wash with water. And the priest shall burn all of it on the altar, as a burnt offering, a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD.

“If his gift for a burnt offering is from the flock, from the sheep or goats, he shall bring a male without blemish, and he shall kill it on the north side of the altar before the LORD, and Aaron's sons the priests shall throw its blood against the sides of the altar. And he shall cut it into pieces, with its head and its fat, and the priest shall arrange them on the wood that is on the fire on the altar, but the entrails and the legs he shall wash with water. And the priest shall offer all of it and burn it on the altar; it is a burnt offering, a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD.

“If his offering to the LORD is a burnt offering of birds, then he shall bring his offering of turtledoves or pigeons. And the priest shall bring it to the altar and wring off its head and burn it on the altar. Its blood shall be drained out on the side of the altar. He shall remove its crop with its contents and cast it beside the altar on the east side, in the place for ashes. He shall tear it open by its wings, but shall not sever it completely. And the priest shall burn it on the altar, on the wood that is on the fire. It is a burnt offering, a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD.

2:1 “When anyone brings a grain offering as an offering to the LORD, his offering shall be of fine flour. He shall pour oil on it and put frankincense on it and bring it to Aaron's sons the priests. And he shall take from it a handful of the fine flour and oil, with all of its frankincense, and the priest shall burn this as its memorial portion on the altar, a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD. But the rest of the grain offering shall be for Aaron and his sons; it is a most holy part of the LORD's food offerings.

“When you bring a grain offering baked in the oven as an offering, it shall be unleavened loaves of fine flour mixed with oil or unleavened wafers smeared with oil. And if your offering is a grain offering baked on a griddle, it shall be of fine flour unleavened, mixed with oil. You shall break it in pieces and pour oil on it; it is a grain offering. And if your offering is a grain offering cooked in a pan, it shall be made of fine flour with oil. And you shall bring the grain offering that is made of these things to the LORD, and when it is presented to the priest, he shall bring it to the altar. And the priest shall take from the grain offering its memorial portion and burn this on the altar, a food offering with a pleasing aroma to the LORD. But the rest of the grain offering shall be for Aaron and his sons; it is a most holy part of the LORD's food offerings.

“No grain offering that you bring to the LORD shall be made with leaven, for you shall burn no leaven nor any honey as a food offering to the LORD. As an offering of firstfruits you may bring them to the LORD, but they shall not be offered on the altar for a pleasing aroma. You shall season all your grain offerings with salt. You shall not let the salt of the covenant with your God be missing from your grain offering; with all your offerings you shall offer salt.

“If you offer a grain offering of firstfruits to the LORD, you shall offer for the grain offering of your firstfruits fresh ears, roasted with fire, crushed new grain. And you shall put oil on it and lay frankincense on it; it is a grain offering. And the priest shall burn as its memorial portion some of the crushed grain and some of the oil with all of its frankincense; it is a food offering to the LORD.

(ESV)

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